Saturday, January 29, 2011

Magazine Cover



For the first magazine cover, I chose Aopa Pilot. At a first glance, I immediately felt a sense of relaxation and comfort. I believe this is due to the background color of what appears to be the sky as the sun might start to be going down. The nameplate is all capital, sans serif font, and each letter outlined in white. The color fills are orange and brown, and seem to be warm welcoming earth toned colors that go hand in hand with the lazy, soothing background color, indicating a natural,earthy vibe – as if flying is meant to be. The word AOPA stands for Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, and has an orange fill. The color orange can be associated with warmth and the changing of seasons, or also the stimulation of appetite. Perhaps the color is being used to associate the Aopa organization and flying with a warm escape from the on ground norm, but yet still have a rare “appetite” shared by few for seeing the earth from a different view. The word Pilot is brown, and blending well with the “of the earth” theme. The main image is a small aircraft that seems to have a smooth shine to it, but is enclosed in the hue of the sky, as if to indicate the aircraft and sky being separate entities forming a strong unique bond, and reminds me of the relationship of the Anemone and Clown Fish, but without the poison. The highlighted topics share the same earth tone brown and orange, while the description of each is all capital serif with a neutral white color. It's as if it was to be saying, “enough of this lovey, earthy stuff, here's what we're talking about”. The next cover is of Plane & Pilot. It is similar with the use of a sans serif all caps font, but unlike the warm earth-toned feel of the Aopa Pilot cover, the name plate uses vibrant yellow outlined in red signifying excitement and movement. That feel is further reinforced with the skewing of the nameplate, as if it were “on the go”. The color blue, which may provoke feelings of calmness and serenity, seems to be giving the impression of a crisp fresh atmosphere of excitement – unlike the Aopa cover which seems to be a slow and “lazy Sunday” feel. The main image is of a small aircraft similar to the one on the Aopa cover. The plane seems to be moving away from the earth into a world experienced by few. The color blue, which also can be associated with intelligence and productivity, is used to tell readers a “smart” way to own your own aircraft without paying a fortune. The main headline “Hot Tips To Avoid Carb Ice” is in yellow, showing the use of the color to deliver alarm and caution to a serious topic. The other main headlines are in the color white – which is neutral, giving no indication of feeling. Various font sizes are used to indicate the ranking or importance of each topic. Unlike the Aopa cover, there is a bar code present in the lower right hand corner, which to me gives the Plane & Pilot organization more of a commercial vibe to it rather than being more isolated and personal like the Aopa cover.

12 comments:

  1. Interesting comparison, they both are very similar.. I like the PLANE & PILOT better all bc of the ampersand. It adds a point of interest. Also the use of complementary colors adds interest.

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  2. I feel more of a prestigious feeling from AOPA. It seems it's for readers who like to get the most out of plane ownership. Where as planes and pilot is more enticing to pilots who may not own a plane, or for a person looking into purchasing a plane. just my 2 cents. cool write up!

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  3. I like the AOPA Pilot main image, it's almost as if the plane is coming at you. Nice comparison.

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  4. Good job, and its hard for me to be interested about planes...

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  5. Interesting take on the color schemes. I like the AOPA cover because they way they made the photo draws your eye to it.

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  6. You did a great job on your comparison's, but I guess you would have to be intersted in reading about planes to buy this type of magazine and I am not to intersted in them.

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  8. Nice work on first stating how the magazine covers of each evoke a certain mood to you as a viewer, it is nice to hear this as an opening statement rather than opening up with the obvious differences and comparisons. good job.

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  9. Nice job but i do think the first magazine stands out more than the second one you are comparing.

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  10. Nice job, something about the second magazine definitely screams "only people who like planes should read this" while the first one seems more open to its audience.

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  11. 2 similiar type magazines, yet each have there distinct diffrences.

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  12. AOPA Pilots lettering and color scheme is more sophisticated and seems more 'rich' than the other magazine. The yellow is kind of cheezy and it makes it look like it is for people that are interested in planes rather than AOPA for people who own them.

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